Pre and Post ride checks

Posted by Ed Brennan on

 
 
 
 
You want your bicycle to be in the best possible condition to ensure you do not have any mechanical failure or even worse a bad accident as you have not checked anything, the process of the ‘M’ check should be done both pre and post ride, it ensures that you have checked every area of your bicycle for anything loose undone od dagederous. This will ensure that your components last longer and that you are as safe as possible as you can be.
Get in the habit of checking your bike regularly. These easy tips are a great way to get started
The “M check” is a simple way to make sure your bike is safe to ride.
What you will need:
    1. bike pump
    2. set of Allen keys torque wrench, pedal spanner
      1. Rear wheel check from the center out.
    It should be snugly fitted and the quick release lever is secure in the closed position (road bikes pointing inwards to the front wheel, MTB bikes pointing rearwards)... Not all wheels will have quick release levers. If the wheel is not quick release, check that the nuts on both sides of the wheel are secure (usually 15mm socket).
    1. Spokes
    Should be of equal tension and not loose.  When you turn the wheel if there are any loose spokes the wheel will be out of tru, also run your finger along each spoke in turn.
    1. Air in tyres
    Inflate your tyre to the required TP (Tyre pressure); there are 2 types of valves presta and Schrader.
     
    1. Rear Brakes
    Ensure that the front is working properly. Ensure the brake latch is down Shimano Sram Road and that there is no grit or dirt on the blocks
    If the brake lever pulls against the handlebar grip, the brake cable needs adjusting. This is done by loosening the brake cable anchor bolt, pulling the cable tighter, and tightening the anchor bolt again. Both sides of the brake mechanism should move when the brake is applied. If this is not happening, turn the small adjustor screw on the stationary side until both sides are moving again.
    Most brakes have these adjustor screws. The brake block must pull flat to the wheel rim. If this is not the case, use an Allen key to tighten the block in the correct position. This is done whilst applying the brake. Finally, check the front brake by applying the brake and pushing the forwards, and check the back brake by applying the brake and pulling the bike backwards.
     
    1. Frame
    Look for any cracks or damage. Focus this check on the area where the frame joins the head tube, this need to be done all the way through the ‘M’ check .
    1. Saddle
    Check your seat post isn’t loose (if the post is carbon use a torque wrench) and that you haven’t exceeded the limit marked on the seat post. Once you have checked these, use an Allen key to tighten the seat post clamp. Check the seat is secure by giving it gentle bump with a clenched fist.
    1. Chain
    Should be clean and oiled. Keeping your chain clean and oiled is important for the smooth running of your bike. If you have too much oil and grit it will wear your cassette and chain rings quicker, also too much lube collects a lot more road dirt and grit.
    8.Crank
    Ensure the crank is secure and that there is no movement from the bottom bracket.
     
    1. Pedals
    Make sure they spin smoothly and that your cranks are on tight, spin smoothly, and don’t creak. Either an Allen key or a pedal spanner.
    1. Stem
    Check that your front wheel and stem do not move independently, they should both roll side to side with little or no force, check that your handlebar clamp bolts are tight. Perform this check by standing in front of the bike, holding the front wheel between your knees, and twisting the handlebars. If you have any movement undo the stem bolts and tighten headset bolt then re tighten the stem bolts.
    1. Headset
    Check if there is any rocking or clicking in the headset. Perform this check by firmly grasping the head tube with one hand and applying the front brake with the other hand. This will steady the front of the bike so that you can shake the headset to establish any rocking or clicking in the bearings.
    1. Handle bars
    Ensure the handle bars are central and do not move whilst clamped in the stem, ensure shifters and brakes are on securely along with bar tape of grips.
     
     
    1. Front Brakes
    Ensure that the front is working properly. Ensure the brake latch is down Shimano Sram Road and that there is no grit or dirt on the blocks
    If the brake lever pulls against the handlebar grip, the brake cable needs adjusting. This is done by loosening the brake cable anchor bolt, pulling the cable tighter, and tightening the anchor bolt again. Both sides of the brake mechanism should move when the brake is applied. If this is not happening, turn the small adjustor screw on the stationary side until both sides are moving again.
    Most brakes have these adjustor screws. The brake block must pull flat to the wheel rim. If this is not the case, use an allen key to tighten the block in the correct position. This is done whilst applying the brake. Finally, check the front brake by applying the brake and pushing the forwards, and check the back brake by applying the brake and pulling the bike backwards.
     
     
    1. Front wheel
    It should be tightly fitted and the quick release lever is secure in the closed position. Not all wheels will have quick release levers. If the wheel is not quick release, check that the nuts on both sides of the wheel are secure.

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    2 comments


    • A usefull and informative article

      Russ Sharp on

    • Very useful article

      edward brennan on

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